Frequently asked questions for Commonwealth Home Support service providers

Page last updated: 04 August 2017

Answers to frequently asked questions from Commonwealth Home Support providers about:

Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program (ACHA)

Where do former ACHA services sit within the CHSP?

All services that were delivered under the Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program now sit within the Assistance with Care and Housing Sub-Programme.

A small number of principal prematurely aged clients accessed linkage services provided by the former ACHA Program. These clients may retain access to equivalent services under the Commonwealth Home Support Programme until other suitable services become available.

How do assessment processes work in regards to the Assistance with Care and Housing Sub-Programme?

It is recognised that a specialised approach is required for Assistance with Care and Housing clients due to their particular circumstances. For clients requiring this service type, Assistance with Care and Housing service providers may be a point of entry, in addition to My Aged Care.

Assistance with Care and Housing service providers can help clients contact the My Aged Care contact centre and work with the My Aged Care Regional Assessment Service, particularly during the assessment process.

Where can I find further information about the ACH Sub-Programme?

Please refer to section 2.2.3 of the CHSP Programme Manual for further information about the ACH Sub-Programme ― including its objective, target population, eligibility and service considerations.

Carers

Will carers continue to be supported under the CHSP?

Yes. The ‘Care Relationships and Carer Support’ sub-programme will continue to support and maintain care relationships between older people and their carers, through providing quality respite care for frail, older people so that regular carers can take a break.

The CHSP is complemented by access to short term and emergency respite services provided through the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres and services provided through the National Carer Counselling Programme and Carer Information Support Service.

Additionally, in the 2015-16 Budget, the Australian Government committed to the development of an Integrated Plan for Carer Support Services (Plan). A key priority of the Plan is to streamline and better coordinate carer support services, which are currently fragmented and difficult to navigate.

As the first step in the Plan, 33.7 million was committed to establish a national carer gateway. On 14 December 2015, Carer Gateway was launched. Carer Gateway is a new national website and phone service that provides information about services and support available for people who care for someone with a disability, chronic illness, dementia, mental illness or frailty due to age.

The national contact centre (1800 422 737) can provide callers with information relevant to their needs and link them to organisations that can provide assistance across a range of carer services.

The website (www.carergateway.gov.au) contains information specific for carers. Functionality includes a service finder and guided search to assist carers to find support and services.

The Australian Government is also developing options for future carer services in the context of, and in alignment with, the aged care and disability reforms, working towards a more integrated response for carer support services.

What’s happening with the other components of the National Respite for Carers Program that are not included in the planned respite services that have moved to the CHSP?

Activities funded under the National Respite for Carers Program have received continued funding to ensure ongoing provision of carer support services as the Integrated Plan for Carer Support Services is designed. This included the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres (CRCCs) to June 2017, Carer Directed Respite Care packages (CDRC) to June 2017, the National Carer Counselling Program to June 2017 and the Carer Information and Support Service to June 2016.

Client Contribution Framework (fees that clients can be asked to pay)

What is the Client Contribution Framework?

The CHSP Client Contribution Framework is a principles-based approach to the charging, collection and reporting of client contributions.

The Client Contribution Framework outlines the principles providers should use to develop and implement their own client contribution policy, with a view to ensuring that those who can afford to contribute to the cost of their care do so, while protecting those most vulnerable. It is designed to support the financial sustainability of the CHSP while creating fairness and consistency in the way in which both new and existing clients contribute to the cost of their care.

There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to client contribution arrangements across the CHSP. Providers can flexibly implement the framework to best meet their organisational needs and their clients’ needs.

As a CHSP provider, am I required to collect fees from clients?

With the introduction of the CHSP, there is an expectation that service providers will ask their clients to contribute to the cost of providing the services they receive to make the programme sustainable into the future and to ensure equity across the country.

However, the Client Contribution Framework does not include a mandatory fees schedule.

CHSP providers should use the principles set out in the Client Contribution Framework and the National Guide to the CHSP Client Contribution Framework to shape the development of their own client contribution policy. Providers will need to consider a client’s income and capacity to pay when determining fees. The client contribution policy should include hardship provisions designed to protect financially vulnerable clients. Service providers must make their policy available to clients and the public.

Service providers should discuss and agree with clients any charges sought before the service is provided.

What happens if a client’s financial circumstances change and they can no longer afford to pay for services?

Clients should not simply cancel the services they are receiving as a result of changing income levels. Service providers are obliged to offer clients experiencing financial hardship alternative arrangements to address their circumstances. Clients should discuss their change in circumstances with their provider.

Where can I find a copy of the Client Contribution Framework and the National Guide to the Client Contribution Framework?

These documents are located online – please click on the following links:

The Client Contribution Framework outlines the principles that providers can adopt in setting and implementing their own client contribution policy, with a view to ensuring that those who can afford to contribute to the cost of their care do so, whilst protecting those most vulnerable.

The National Guide to the Client Contribution Framework complements the framework and has been developed to help providers establish flexible options for client contribution arrangements. The guide should be used in conjunction with the CHSP Programme Manual.

Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP)

What is the Commonwealth Home Support Programme?

From 1 July 2015, a number of existing programs (Commonwealth Home and Community Care Program, planned respite from the National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP), Day Therapy Centres Program (DTC) and the Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program (ACHA)) were streamlined to form the CHSP.

The CHSP provides entry-level aged care support services to help older clients remain independent and in their own homes and communities for longer.

Will the CHSP be available in all states and territories?

The CHSP is implemented in all states and territories, including Victoria and Western Australia, where it will combine planned respite from the National Respite for Carers Program, Day Therapy Centres Program and Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program operating in those two states. The Victorian and Western Australian Home and Community Care Programs are jointly funded Commonwealth-state programs and continue to be administered by the state governments.

When will Victorian HACC form part of the CHSP?

From 1 July 2016, the Australian Government will assume full funding, policy and operational responsibility for HACC services for older people in Victoria to form part of the CHSP, with Victoria continuing to fund HACC services for people aged under 65 years (under 50 years for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people), with some services and clients transitioning to the National Disability Insurance Scheme as it rolls out in Victoria.

When will Western Australian HACC form part of the CHSP?

Negotiations for a transition of the HACC Program for older people in Western Australia to the CHSP are at an early stage.

Complaints

Will CHSP clients have access to a complaints scheme?

Yes. Anyone can raise concerns about the quality of care or services being delivered to people receiving aged care services funded by the Australian Government which includes the Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP).

A complaint can be raised in the following ways:

  • Directly with the service provider through their publicly available complaints system
  • With the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner (www.agedcarecomplaints.govspace.gov.au) or by telephone on 1800 550 552 (a free call from fixed lines; calls from mobiles may be charged at a higher rate). The Aged Care Complaints Commissioner provides a free service for anyone to raise their concerns about the quality of care or services being delivered to people receiving aged care services funded by the Australian Government.

Day Therapy Centres

What’s happening with Day Therapy Centres?

Former Day Therapy Centre services will be delivered under the Community and Home Support Sub-Programme, with the bulk of services sitting under the ‘Allied Health and Therapy Services’ service type.

Can clients on Home Care Packages access Day Therapy Centres?

The care needs of a person receiving a Home Care Package (HCP) should be addressed through their HCP. Any CHSP services delivered to them will generally be paid on a full cost recovery basis from the client’s individualised HCP budget. In defined circumstances, however, a HCP client may access services in addition to the services they are receiving from their HCP budget (please refer to the ‘ Home Care Packages’ section of this document).

Existing clients who are currently accessing Day Therapy Centre services in addition to their current package will continue to receive this level of support as per the grandfathering (please refer to the grandfathering section of this document) arrangements in place for the CHSP.

Can clients in residential care access Day Therapy Centres?

Residential care clients will not be able to access CHSP services unless on a full cost recovery basis or under grandfathering arrangements.

Dementia

Are people with dementia listed as a special needs group for the CHSP?

The Australian Government considers the provision of appropriate care and support of people with dementia, their families and carers to be core business for all service providers of aged care, given its prevalence amongst older people.

The Australian Government funds a range of advisory services, education and training, support programmes and other services for people with dementia, their families and carers. CHSP clients may access these supports if appropriate to their needs.

Department of Veteran Affairs (DVA)

Can clients access DVA and CHSP services?

Yes. Veterans are able to access CHSP services so long as the client is eligible for services, the support required from the CHSP is entry-level, and there is no duplication in the specific services/assistance being provided through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs-funded services they are receiving.

For example, you may access Veterans Home Care (VHC) for low-level domestic assistance and personal care, but also receive transport and meal services through CHSP.

Disability

What happens to people who acquire a disability after age 65?

Older people who are not accessing the National Disability Insurance Scheme but have a disability and are aged 65 or over will be able to access the CHSP if they are eligible, but within its scope as the entry tier of aged care. CHSP service providers are required to make reasonable provisions to accommodate the specific needs of clients with disabilities to enable them to access services that are within scope, such as providing National respite services that are responsive to a client’s specific needs.

I provide services for younger clients aged under 65 years with a disability. As this is now merging into the CHSP, how will the CHSP cater to my clients?

Existing clients (refer to Grandfathering section on page 6 for definition) aged under 65 years who were accessing services under the National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) or, Day Therapy Centres (DTC) Program prior to 1 July 2015, will be allowed to continue to receive services under the CHSP until:

  • A more appropriate service becomes available, such as the National Disability Insurance Scheme
  • They no longer require the service
  • The expiration of the Grant Agreement for the CHSP.

This is necessary to ensure this group of clients has access to services until they can access more appropriate care.

Goods, Equipment and Assistive Technologies

Will goods, equipment and assistive technologies be provided under the CHSP?

Goods, equipment and assistive technologies can be purchased under the CHSP. However, the CHSP is not designed to replace existing state managed schemes which provide medical aids and equipment (e.g. Medical Aids Subsidy Scheme). Service providers are encouraged to access these state and territory aids and equipment programs where available.

What financial support is available to CHSP clients under the Goods, Equipment and Assistive Technologies service type?

It is expected that clients who are unable to purchase item/s independently will be able to access up to $500 in total support per financial year under the Goods, Equipment and Assistive Technology service type.

This cap applies in total per client, regardless of how many items are loaned or purchased. It is not a cap applied per item. Where a service provider assesses it to be necessary, however, they have the discretion to increase the cap to $1000 per client per financial year.

Service providers must record the amount spent in the ‘Notes’ section of the My Aged Care central client record.

Grandfathering

What does ‘grandfathering’ mean?

Grandfathering means allowing an existing client (of the former Commonwealth HACC, NRCP, DTC or ACHA prior to 30 June 2015) to continue receiving the same level of support, regardless of the introduction of the CHSP rules and requirements for new clients from 1 July 2015.

A grandfathered client has their care and/or services maintained, until their care needs change or more appropriate care and/or services become available.

What is the definition of ‘existing clients’?

Under the CHSP from 1 July 2015, all existing clients are grandfathered.

Existing clients are:

  • Commonwealth HACC, recipients of planned respite from the NRCP, DTC or ACHA clients who, as at 1 July 2015:
  • were accessing a service OR
  • had a current booking for service OR
  • accessed services (perhaps intermittently) at least three times during the 2014–15 financial year (e.g. three episodes of receiving meals) OR
  • received care for a continuous period of six months or more during the 2014–15 financial year.
  • Existing clients also includes those who would no longer meet the CHSP eligibility requirements but were receiving services pre July.

What happens if a grandfathered client’s needs change?

If a grandfathered client’s needs change, the client should be referred to My Aged Care for re-assessment. Based on the outcome of this assessment, the client may be supported to transition to more appropriate care and/or services (such as different CHSP services or a Home Care Package)

Is it okay for clients needing services that are over the level of ‘Entry-Level Support’ to stay in the CHSP while they wait for suitable supports and programmes?

Existing clients receiving services prior to 1 July 2015 that are comparable in volume and cost to the type of care provided under a Home Care Package will be grandfathered and supported while they transition to more suitable supports and programmes. This includes consideration of their eligibility for a Home Care Package or residential care.

These grandfathered clients will continue to receive support from their current service provider at the current service level until they are transitioned to other forms of more appropriate care to better meet their needs.

Is it okay for clients to stay in the CHSP while they wait for a suitable Home Care Package to become available?

Existing clients receiving services over ‘entry-level’ support prior to 1 July 2015 and waiting for a Home Care Package will be grandfathered until the Home Care Package becomes available.

What about clients under the age of 65?

Grandfathering arrangements also extends to existing clients under 65 years of age.

Clients aged under 65 years who were accessing services under the NRCP or DTC Programme prior to 1 July 2015 will be allowed to continue receiving services under the CHSP until:

  • a more appropriate service becomes available, such as the NDIS
  • they no longer require the service
  • the expiration of the grant agreement for the CHSP.

This is necessary to ensure this group of clients has access to services until they can access more appropriate care.

Prior to 1 July 2015, some residents of aged care homes were accessing DTC Program services. Can that continue under the CHSP?

Yes. Prior to 1 July 2015, services funded under the DTC Program were available to residents with an Aged Care Funding Instrument (ACFI) ‘low’ score in Australian Government funded residential facilities. These existing DTC clients will be grandfathered under the CHSP.

From 1 July 2015, CHSP services will not be offered to permanent residents of residential aged care facilities (except under grandfathering arrangements or a full-cost recovery basis).

Prior to 1 July 2015, the ACHA Program provided services to some clients who were homeless or at risk of homelessness under the age of 50 years. Can that continue under the CHSP?

Yes. A small number of prematurely aged clients accessed linkage services provided by the former ACHA Program. These clients can retain access to equivalent services under the CHSP until other suitable services become available.

Given long term case management is no longer a service type under the CHSP, what is happening with existing clients who are receiving these services?

The Department has worked with service providers regarding grandfathering arrangements for clients currently receiving higher-intensity, longer term case management services. These transition arrangements will ensure clients continue to receive the same level of service. All affected service providers have been notified of the funding they will receive to undertake the transition arrangements.

What happens if a client had been receiving services (under Commonwealth HACC, NRCP, DTC or ACHA) but stops for some reason, then wants to resume those services after 1 July 2015, but doesn’t have a current booking?

The client should be grandfathered if, during the 2014-15 financial year, the client had either:

  • accessed services (perhaps intermittently) at least three times (e.g. three episodes of receiving meals)

OR

  • received care for a continuous period of six months or more.

If neither of those circumstances apply, the client will be treated as a ‘new client’ under the CHSP and should be referred to My Aged Care from 1 July 2015.

Is there a time limit to grandfathering arrangements?

It is expected that grandfathering arrangements would occur from 1 July 2015 and extend until such time as all grandfathered clients are transitioned to other more appropriate services. This may mean some clients remain grandfathered for the life of the programme.

Growth funding

Will there be a growth round?

Growth funding is important to the sector’s ability to respond to the evolving needs of CHSP clients. Service providers will be advised of any CHSP funding processes, including growth funding. Information will also be available at:

  • Department of Health’s Grants website
  • Australian Government’s Grants website
  • Information may also be available via major national newspapers.

What will be the focus of future growth funds?

Growth funding will be reported as part of the Australian Government’s budget process and allocated on the basis of funding priorities as determined by the Australian Government from time to time. Identification of funding priorities for the CHSP will be informed by consultation with relevant stakeholders.

Transition Support Funding

What is transition support funding?

On 23 June 2015, the Government announced that funding would be granted to support service providers transitioning to the CHSP.

$20 million in transition support funding was allocated to transitioning CHSP service providers as a contribution towards recognised activities already undertaken to transition to the new CHSP arrangements.

Thank you to all providers who have responded to their letter of offer for CHSP transition support funding. All letters have been issued. Providers are not required to provide any information until January 2016. A financial declaration form will be provided by your Grant Agreement Manager for completion.

Home Care Packages

Can Home Care Package clients access the CHSP?

The care needs of a person receiving a Home Care Package should be addressed through their Home Care Package, and any CHSP services delivered to them would generally be paid on a full cost-recovery basis from the Home Care Package client’s individualised budget.

In defined circumstances, however, a Home Care Package client may access CHSP services in addition to the services they are receiving from their Home Care Package budget (that is, the additional CHSP services will not be charged to the client’s individualised budget). These circumstances include:

  • where the Home Care Package client’s budget is already fully allocated, a Home Care Package client can access additional, short-term or episodic Allied Health and Therapy services or nursing services from the CHSP
  • where the Home Care Package client’s budget is already fully allocated, and a carer requires it, a Home Care Package client can access additional planned respite services under the CHSP

In an emergency (such as when the carer is not able to maintain their caring role), where a Home Care Package client’s budget is already fully allocated, additional services under the broader CHSP can be obtained on an emergency or short term basis.

Can a client access CHSP services while on a waitlist for a Home Care Package?

Where a new client has been assessed and approved as eligible for a Home Care Package, the client will be able to receive services under the CHSP as an interim arrangement, but only to an entry-level of support consistent with the Commonwealth Home Support Programme, not at the level of support of the Package they are eligible for.

Home Modifications

What financial support is available to CHSP clients under the Home Modifications service type?

The intent of the CHSP is to primarily fund simple home modifications (i.e. modifications that would incur a cost of less than $1,000). Modifications that would incur a cost of over $10,000 are not supported under the CHSP. The $10,000 cap is the Government contribution and applies per client per financial year.

Service providers must record the amount spent in the ‘Notes’ section of the My Aged Care central client record.

How do grandfathering arrangements apply to existing clients who have already been assessed as needing a home modification prior to 1 July 2015?

Under the grandfathering arrangements, existing Commonwealth HACC clients previously assessed as needing a home modification and who have a booking or have been waitlisted for that service as at 1 July 2015, can continue to receive the home modification as previously agreed.

The transfer of a client and a service to another service provider under the CHSP programme does not negate these arrangements.

My Aged Care

I have questions regarding My Aged Care and the provider portal?

If you have questions about using the My Aged Care provider portal, the Department encourages you to review support materials (available on www.dss.gov.au/MyAgedCare) and talk to colleagues to resolve any concerns or questions in the first instance.

If this does not help answer your question or concern, please contact the My Aged Care provider and assessor helpline on 1800 836 799. The helpline is available between 8am to 8pm Monday to Friday and 10am to 2pm Saturday, local time across Australia.

Why is it important to update my details in the My Aged Care provider portal?

It is critically important that organisations update and maintain information about the services they deliver in the My Aged Care provider portal. This information is publically displayed in the service finders on the My Aged Care website and will be used by the My Aged Care contact centre and assessors to ensure accurate referrals for service(s).

How does My Aged Care work in WA?

Western Australian providers will continue to be able to accept clients directly as well as receive referrals through their existing referral pathways.

As there is no My Aged Care Regional Assessment Service in Western Australia, they will not conduct face-to-face assessments for CHSP services. Western Australian CHSP providers will continue to hold separate responsibility for service delivery assessment functions.

If a consumer contacts My Aged Care, they will directly refer clients to the existing Western Australia intake point. My Aged Care will not register clients, create a client record or undertake a screening process

New agreement process

Who can I contact if I have a query in regards to my new CHSP Grant Agreement?

You can contact your Grant Agreement Manager in your State Office to discuss any issues or concerns you may have with your new CHSP Grant Agreement.

What is an Activity Work plan and how does it form a part of my new CHSP Grant Agreement?

An Activity Work plan documents a shared understanding of the services and outputs that a service provider delivered to older people in aged care planning regions.

Activity Work Plans are being progressively finalised. If you have questions about your AWP, please speak to the Grant Agreement Manager in your state or territory.

Palliative Care

Can CHSP clients access palliative care services?

State and territory governments are responsible for the provision and delivery of palliative care and hospice services as part of state health and community service provision responsibilities.

CHSP clients are able to receive palliative care services from their local health system in addition to their home support services, but this needs to be arranged by the person’s GP, or treating hospital. As with any palliative care arrangement, the palliative care team would coordinate the skills and disciplines of many service providers to ensure appropriate care services. This would include working with the client’s CHSP service provider(s).

Reclassification process

What was the purpose of the reclassification exercise for Commonwealth HACC counselling, support, information and advocacy and non-outputs?

In early 2015, the Department sent out a questionnaire to service providers funded for counselling, support, information and advocacy (CSIA) and non-outputs to review their current activities. The purpose of this exercise was to gather information in order to align their current activity with future CHSP service streams and other programmes.

This was not a cost saving exercise and the overwhelming majority of funding that we reviewed has been classified into alternative activities.

What were the outcomes of the reclassification process?

For service providers that deliver services under the CHSP, counselling, support, information, advocacy and non-output activities were reclassified into the National Aged Care Advocacy Program (NACAP).

How do I report on service delivery from 1 November 2015?

Reporting requirements under the CHSP has been reduced and streamlined through the introduction of the Data Exchange (DEX). DEX became available on 1 November 2015 allowing service providers to commence reporting on their service delivery in line with their new CHSP grant agreements.

From 1 November 2015 service providers programme performance data will be reduced to a small set of priority requirements with two six-monthly reporting periods. DEX also improvises reporting arrangements by providing a simple and easy to use IT tool that allows for system-to-system transfers or a free web-based portal. Service providers can also choose to participate in a partnership approach to provide additional outcomes focussed information in return for the receipt of regular reports, relevant to your service and local area.

Where can I find more information on the Data Exchange?

The Department held webinars focused on the CHSP Data Exchange to provide a brief overview of the policy and framework behind the Data Exchange and to assist IT vendors assisting service providers during the transition to the Data Exchange. A recording of these webinars are available for viewing on the Departments website. Workshops were also held nationally from September to November 2015 to provide training and support to service providers in the lead up to 1 November.

A new version of the Data Exchange Protocols was released to include enhancements made for the CHSP and a reporting timeline was sent to providers clearly outlining the reporting requirements for 1 July 2015 to 30 July 2016. These documents are available on the Data Exchange website.

All information on the Data Exchange including task cards, user access forms and updates can be found at: dex.dss.gov.au.

How do I acquit funds for the services delivered from 1 November 2015?

Acquittals of funding from 1 November 2015 are covered under the new CHSP grant agreements and will be managed as part of standard Health financial acquittal processes.

Will I be required to meet the reporting milestone of 30 January 2016?

While providers will be able to access the Data Exchange from 1 November 2015 the Department recognises that some additional transition time may be necessary to allow providers to establish the Data Exchange into their business. Providers can familiarise themselves with the Data Exchange over the November/December period and be ready to meet their first reporting milestone on 30 July 2016 (for the January – June period).

When is the first reporting milestone that I will be required to meet for the Data Exchange?

The first reporting milestone for the Data Exchange is on 30 July 2016 (for the January – June period).

My service is funded for both over 65 and under 65 clients. How will I need to maintain my current processes of reporting under the Data Exchange?

From 1 November the Data Exchange will be available for all service providers who have entered into a new CHSP grant agreement. As the CHSP brings together four separate programmes, each with different historical reporting arrangements, the Data Exchange will be used from 1 November 2015 for all CHSP activity reporting.

The use of the Data Exchange is for CHSP funded activities. If you receive funding from other sources including state Government HACC, these arrangements will not apply and you will need to observe their reporting requirements.

Residential Care

Can residential clients access CHSP services?

Residential care clients will not be able to access CHSP services unless on a full cost recovery basis or under grandfathering arrangements.

Translating and Interpreting Services and resources

How can CHSP service providers access interpreting support?

CHSP service providers are eligible to access Commonwealth Government funded interpreting support through TIS National. Information on what can be accessed through TIS National is available at www.tisnational.gov.au

Providers need to register for a TIS National client code which they can use to book services via TIS Online. If a service is needed urgently and a CHSP provider does not yet have a client code, they can call TIS National directly on 1300 655 820 (within Australia) during business hours for assistance.

For more details on how to access TIS National services, please see the fact sheet Interpreting support for service providers, available on the CHSP website at www.dss.gov.au/chsp.

What services are available from TIS National?

TIS National provides:

  • immediate phone interpreting
  • TIS voice automated immediate phone interpreting
  • Pre-booked phone interpreting
  • on-site interpreting

What translated resources are available for consumers?

My Aged Care has available a number of resources to help people access information and services in their language. Please visit www.myagedcare.gov.au/other-languages.

How should CHSP service providers use TIS National?

The Department encourages all CHSP service providers to prioritise using TIS National services to support non-English speaking clients to participate fully in discussions about their preferences and priorities for how their CHSP services are delivered.

Service providers are also encouraged to use telephone interpreting wherever possible, unless there is a genuine need to for an on-site interpreter.

Wellness and Reablement

What support is there for service providers to deliver services using a wellness approach?

The Department has developed the Living well at home: CHSP Good Practice Guide (Good Practice Guide) to support service providers to deliver services using a wellness approach.

The Good Practice Guide is intended to provide information about what good practice looks like when using wellness approaches in home support services and what organisations and individual workers can do to successfully adopt these approaches. Service providers will be expected to adopt wellness approaches in their service delivery practices although it is also anticipated that this will take time to achieve and will be supported by additional capacity-building activities.

What is the Living well at home: CHSP Good Practice Guide?

The Good Practice Guide is a resource for organisations funded under the CHSP that provides guidance in implementing wellness, reablement and restorative care approaches in CHSP service delivery. It builds on existing examples of wellness, reablement and restorative care approaches in home care services and draws on communications, capacity-building and training products that have been developed over a number of years in all jurisdictions and overseas.

How should service providers who are already using a restorative and reablement approach in service delivery use the Living well at home: CHSP Good Practice Guide?

The Good Practice Guide has been developed to support wellness, reablement and restorative care approaches in home care services. For service providers who are already using a wellness approach in service delivery they may find the Guide useful in helping them to find ways to build on what they are already doing well to further embed these approaches across other areas of their organisation at both business and practice levels. You can find a copy of the Living well at home: CHSP Good Practice Guide at this link.

Will the Department be providing any other support to service providers to plan for and implement wellness approaches?

The Department is currently exploring ways to support service providers through the process of culture change required in their planning for and implementing wellness and will provide details in the near future.

The Department remains open to further input into the Good Practice Guide including additional resources that can be cited. The intention is to update the Guide from time to time.

Change of administration of CHSP from Social Services to the Department of Health

Due to Commonwealth Government changes, responsibility for ageing and aged care (including the CHSP) moved from the Department of Social Services to the Department of Health in November 2015.

This change has had no impact on the operation of the CHSP.